Bonds in Brickwork | Building Construction





Various types of bonds in Brick work

What is a bond?

When bricks are laid adjacent to each other forming a groove in between the bricks which is filled by cement mortar is called a bond. Bonding helps in even distribution of loads over a large area.

There are various types of bonds. Bricks are arranged in courses in such a way that they are tied together and also care is taken of the vertical joints that are formed when bricks are arranged in courses. The bricks used for the purpose of masonry construction are uniform in size.

Bilbee herring bond

Bilbee herring bond

The rule is, “Vertical joints of the successive courses of bricks should not coincide, that is, a continuous vertical joint across the wall should be avoided since it will gradually result into cracks development.” The strength and stability of the wall is less as compared to the properly bonded brickwork. Improperly arranged bricks forming continuous vertical joints are also called “unbounded walls”.

Like I mentioned earlier, there are various types of bonds; these bonds are distinguished by their appearance which basically means their bonding style (fashion in which bricks interlock to tie themselves together).

Rules for good bonding:

Good bond is possible if:

  • Uniform size bricks are used
  • Length of the brick is twice its width plus one joint inorder to obtain a uniform lap.
  • Minimum of 1/4th of the brick is placed along the length of the wall and ½ of the brick should be placed across the thickness of the wall.
  • Use of brick bats is avoided
  • The centre line of header and stretcher in the alternate courses is made to coincide with each other in order to obtain a stable wall.
  • Stretchers are used in the facing.
  • Headers are used in the hearting.
  • To increase the stability and bonding, every sixth course should be provided as a header course on both sides of the wall.

This was all about “bonding”. Now we will list out various types of bonds and discuss them in detail in our succeeding articles.

  1. Stretcher bond
  2. Header bond
  3. Facing bond
  4. English bond
  5. Flemish bond
  6. Dutch bond
  7. English cross bond
  8. Brick on edge bond
  9. Raking bond
  10. Zigzag bond
  11. Garden wall bond

 



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  1. #1 by sruti Sahoo on February 3, 2012 - 4:54 am

    Very good information about engineering and also i appreciate your time consuming effort but somewhere i found some concepts are not fully explained.

    Thank you

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